Exercise and Diabetes Should Not be Strangers

Senior Health and Fitness day is an opportunity for anyone who is aging into their golden years to remember just how valuable fitness is to their body, and investigate options available to them. This is particularly important if you’re also struggling with diabetes. Exercise and diabetes aren’t always linked in people’s minds, but they should be.

Exercise is actually beneficial for anyone with diabetes. It improves many of your body’s functions, including your ability to control your blood sugar levels. It also encourages better circulation and muscle strength—both of which are very important for your feet to be able to support you. Of course, you have to plan your activities carefully and engage in exercise that is foot-safe.

Low-impact, aerobic exercises are good for anyone with diabetes. Without the hard pounding, your feet won’t have to absorb strong and potentially damaging shocks, but they will still be challenged. This also works your circulation, driving much-needed blood flow to your lower limbs. Walking, biking, swimming, water aerobics, and even moderate gardening are all things that work your body without risking hard hits to your feet.

Strength activities, like conditioning, build your lower limbs’ stability. This will help you with your balance, independence, and mobility as you age, too. Like anything else, it simply has to be done carefully to prevent injuries. Moderate weight lifting, resistance band training, and basic dynamic exercises like lunges and squats all fit into this category.

Exercise and diabetes belong together. You do have to be careful with how you go about your activities, but staying fit helps your body, and your condition, in many different ways. If you’d like to start exercising, Foot Care Specialists, PC, can help you determine what will be best for your lower limbs. Request an appointment today!

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